Electorate analysis – Mangere

The primary focus of our campaign this year was to take either the Mangere electorate or East Coast Bays, to avoid the 5% threshold. Jerry Filipaina was campaigning full-time in Mangere for a year before the election, and by the election the party had visited every house five times. However our actual results there were disappointing. The main results (parties gaining over 100 votes) are below, full results may be found here.

Parties Candidates
New Zealand Pacific Party 2,212 FIELD, Taito Lemalu Phillip NZPP 4,767
Family Party 237 FILIPAINA, Galumalemana Jerry FAM 856
RAM – Residents Action Movement 14 FOWLER, Roger RAM 138
National Party 3,641 HARRIS, Mita NAT 3,081
MATATUMUA, Lemalu Talia IND 48
Jim Anderton’s Progressive 137 PO’E, Tala JAP 126
Labour Party 13,162 SIO, Su’a William LAB 11,263
United Future 182 SOLOMON, Pulotu Selio UFNZ 389
Green Party 452 STRICKSON-PUA, Muamua Sofi GP 462
ACT New Zealand 252 TABACHNIK, Michael ACT 214
Mäori Party 165
New Zealand First Party 767
Party Informals 245 Candidate Informals 343
TOTAL 21,688 TOTAL 21,687

I will do my best to describe the situation in Mangere, but remember I was campaigning in Selwyn at the other end of the country, so if anyone spots any errors stick them in the comments & I’ll fix it.

No media organisation published polls for Mangere in the run-up to the election. We were unable to have a professional poll conducted, due to the workload of polling companies or their refusal to conduct one due to having a conflict of interest because they were conducting polls for another party.

However a month before the election we conducted an internal poll, which I am now able to release publicly. Although conducted by ourselves, it was done as rigorously as possible to ensure it was accurate. This poll showed Sio (Labour) on 28%, Jerry (Family) on 31%, and Field (Pacific) on 33%. In other words, all three candidates were neck and neck, so it could go any way. It was on the basis of this poll that we were able to campaign saying that Jerry had a decent chance of taking the electorate.

In the month following that poll our campaign stepped up in an attempt to bring Jerry into the lead. Our final visit of every house in Mangere occurred on the Saturday prior to the election, when the team visited 14,500 homes in the one day. Our brochures were pushing the “2 for 1” message, ie vote for Jerry and get two local MPs, as Sio would be in on the list anyway. On Friday night before the election the team was parading around Mangere and Manukau East until midnight with the truck, billboard trailer and motorbikes!

However, the campaigns of Labour and the Pacific Party also swung into gear strongly in the last few weeks. Labour was particularly well-resourced, and being already ingrained in the culture would have made an impression on many voters. Old habits die hard, and if a voter was still undecided on polling day (due to heavy campaigns by three different parties) they may well have just ticked Labour because they always had.

Liberty Scott has questioned what Labour campaigners were actually telling people, as the fact that some believed their benefits would be cut if National got in certainly makes it sound like some Labour campaigners could have been spreading lies about National. If this is the case, this could have turned voters off not only National but any party hoping to go into coalition with them, such as ourselves.

Labour was also ringing people up on the morning of the election, and giving their supporters rides to the polling booth. We simply didn’t have the resources to do the same this year.

Many Mangere voters did not actually vote. Only around 20,000 voters turned out in the South Auckland electorates, as opposed to over 30,000 in most other electorates. There is a possibility that many people who were intending to vote for us when polled, did not end up actually voting. However more Labour supporters would have voted due to the free lifts to the polling booths. It is also possible that some people who were intending to vote for Jerry were picked up by Labour, which influenced them to vote Labour after all.

As a result of all these factors, and possibly others, Jerry’s support on polling day was nowhere near as high as he had polled, the election result really took us by surprise.

In future, when targeting South Auckland electorates, we will have to be very careful to address all these factors. We must ensure voters understand MMP, so they clearly understand they can vote for our candidate and still support Labour if they wish. We must ensure they have accurate information about policies, and keep an ear to the ground for what Labour campaigners are actually saying to the people (not just the official campaign material).

And we’ll probably need to hire a load of buses for election day!

EDIT:

There is a real possibility that our campaign helped to reduce Labour’s votes from Mangere. In 2005 Labour took 21,000 votes from Mangere, from a total turnout of 29,000. Although it wasn’t great for us, possibly our campaign resulted in many voters being confused who to vote for, as they may have been put off Labour but unconvinced whether they should vote for us, and therefore they stayed home. This year Labour only got 13,000 votes in Mangere. So although our campaign there didn’t get us in, it could well have dented Labour’s election performance considerably and so still helped to change the government.

4 Responses to “Electorate analysis – Mangere”

  1. kiwipolemicist Says:

    Is it part of the Pacific Island culture to vote as the head of the house votes? Jerry would know about this.

    If so, then your target demographic is obvious.

    Getting your team to visit 14,500 homes in one day is an impressive feat. Perhaps the fact that you got 856 electorate votes and 237 party votes indicates that the 2-for-1 message did get through to some people.

    I don’t want be discouraging, but I think that Mangere has fallen for the Labour lies and getting them to vote otherwise will be like parting the Red Sea, i.e. a miracle will be required.

    It is interesting the Pacific Islanders are usually pro-smacking but they still voted Labour.

  2. Mr Dennis Says:

    I don’t know for certain, but I understand the head of the household would have a large influence. We had some very prominent families come behind us, and Jerry has actually been bestowed a prestigious title by the Malietoa family, up till recently the royal family of Samoa. I understand this title carries a lot of weight in the community.
    http://www.familyparty.org.nz/index/press-releases/press-releases-aug-2008/endorsement-on-family-party-mangere-campaign?searched=title&highlight=ajaxSearch_highlight+ajaxSearch_highlight1

    Our Manukau East candidate, Papali’i Poutoa Papali’i, comes from a prestigious family as well, and should also carry a lot of weight in the community. So we were gaining high-level support, but you are probably right that targeting more heads of household would be effective. I know little about the Pacific culture however, I’m a white South Islander, so can’t comment too much!

  3. Electorate analysis - East Coast Bays « Samuel Dennis - Family Party candidate for Selwyn Says:

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  4. Rhys Says:

    I think parties underestimate the ability for Mangere voters to make an informed vote. Sure there maybe a habit to voting Labour for some people, but that is characteristic of many other voters irrespective of which electorate they are in or ethnicity. I’ve read many vox pop comments where people vote “because that’s the party my mum/dad/family have always voted for”. Give us South Aucklanders some credit.

    I voted Labour after doing my own research into various parties’ policies, and I also attended the “meet the candidates” evening held at the Papatoetoe Town Hall. I didn’t vote out of habit, but with a free and informed mind.


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